12.15.2017



Man of Sorrows

Lord, You're weeping with me
Help me to believe
That when my heart, is heavy as a stone
You say I'm not alone

Man of sorrows, what a name
Bore our suffering, bore all of our pain
Man of sorrows, broken sinners to reclaim
Overcame the darkness, and walked out of the grave

Lord, You're aching with me
Help me to believe
That when my soul, is lost in the storm
You're acquainted with my grief

He was pierced for our transgressions
He was crushed for all our sins
And the punishment that brought us peace was laid on Him
He was stricken and afflicted
But God's mercy would reveal
What His suffering would bring us by His wounds we're healed

Man of sorrows, what a name
Bore our suffering, bore all of our pain
Man of sorrows, broken sinners to reclaim
Overcame the darkness, and walked out of the grave
You overcame my darkness, when You walked out of the grave…

Ellie Holcomb, Red Sea Road

https://open.spotify.com/album/4RhEJVjtGp7IRAfd0HvqG8

Man of Sorrows



He was despised and rejected by men,
    a man of sorrows and acquainted with grief;
and as one from whom men hide their faces
    he was despised, and we esteemed him not.

Surely he has borne our griefs
    and carried our sorrows;
yet we esteemed him stricken,
    smitten by God, and afflicted.

But he was pierced for our transgressions;
    he was crushed for our iniquities;
upon him was the chastisement that brought us peace,
    and with his wounds we are healed.

Yet it was the will of the Lord to crush him;
    he has put him to grief…

Isaiah 53:3-5, 10a


Therefore, since we are surrounded by so great a cloud of witnesses, let us also lay aside every weight, and sin which clings so closely, and let us run with endurance the race that is set before us, 2 looking to Jesus, the founder and perfecter of our faith, who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is seated at the right hand of the throne of God. — Hebrews 12:1-2



The Word became flesh and dwelt among us. (John 1:14)

“The Word became flesh.” Those four words can sound so familiar to us that we fail to appreciate the magnitude of John’s statement (echoed by the other New Testament writers). The divine (v. 1) became human (v. 14). The infinite, omnipotent, omniscient, omnipresent Son of God took on a human nature: finite, limited in power, limited in knowledge, limited in space and time. It’s one thing to claim God would ever do such a thing. It’s yet another to suppose God could ever do such a thing—that he could clothe himself with frail humanity, veiling his divine glory without relinquishing for one moment any aspect of his divine nature. The Danish Lutheran philosopher Søren Kierkegaard referred to the incarnation as the “absolute paradox” of the Christian faith. How could the eternal inhabit the temporal? How could the finite accommodate the infinite?
We may not know how this mystery could be reality, but by the testimony of inspired Scripture we know with certainty (Luke 1:4) it was and is reality. This is a mystery of the first order.

Science fiction writers like to speculate about cataclysmic events with the potential to “rupture the space-time continuum.” I confess I’m not sure what that means, but I suspect that if anything might threaten such a rupture, it would be the incarnation of God!


—James Anderson



The Prologue

Before there was a universe,
Before a star or planet,
When time had still not yet begun —
I scarcely understand it —
Th’ eternal Word was with his God,
God’s very Self-Expression;
Th’ eternal Word was God himself —
And God had planned redemption.
The Word became our flesh and blood —
The stuff of his creation —
The Word was God, the Word was flesh,
Astounding incarnation!
But when he came to visit us,
We did not recognize him.
Although we owed him everything
We haughtily despised him.
In days gone by God showed himself
In grace and truth to Moses;
But in the Word of God made flesh
Their climax he discloses.
For grace and truth in fullness came
And showed the Father’s glory
When Jesus donned our flesh and died:
This is the gospel story.
All who delighted in his name,
All those who did receive him,
All who by grace were born of God,
All who in truth believed him —
To them he gave a stunning right:
Becoming God’s dear children!
Here will I stay in grateful trust;
Here will I fix my vision.
Before there was a universe,
Before a star or planet,
When time had still not yet begun —
I scarcely understand it —
Th’ eternal Word was with his God,
God’s very Self-Expression;
Th’ eternal Word was God himself —

And God had planned redemption.

--D.A. Carson